PETER EWIG, OPENING OF THE NARROW CHANNEL
February 25 - April 29, 2005

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Exhibited works:
Isolation Camp, 2004, single-channel video
Relate, 2004, 3-channel video-installation
Unterminierung der vorangegangenen Ebenen als Ebene, instabil 1, 2004, 4 channel video-installation


In Peter Ewig's video-works the human mind is on display. It's like witnessing the brains neuronal processes, being in constant movement, flickering from association to association. In his first solo-exhibition in Dusseldorf "Eroeffnung Des Engen Kanals" Peter Ewig shows three video-works on monitors. The installation of the monitors is inseparable part of each work, giving the moving works a steady sculptural presence (see images below). In "Relate" three Peter Ewig's on three monitors talk about art and the artists role. This constant flow of words is hardly understandable, concentration is needed to dive into the artists world of thought. Sometimes single sentences and words pop up, clichées of being an artist. The work is true and reveiling and at the same time full of clichées, funny and thoughtful. "Unterminierung der vorangegangenen Ebenen als Ebene, instabil 1" shows the virtual world of the computer screen. We see the stagnating download of a pornographic film and the artists writing down his thoughts and comments on plastic foil, piling these on top of each other on the screen. Through this narrative process he reverses the virtuality of the underlying level of the computer-screen and brings it back to the "handmade" world. In "Isolation Camp" we see the artist in his studio at 6:30 in the morning, seemingly after a night full of work, a bird hysterically singing in the background and greeting the morning. It's a very existentialistic comment on the artistic existence and a beautiful moment of introspection. Originally coming from painting, we sense Peter Ewigs feeling for color and (to use the old-fashioned term) composition, creating challenging works of unseen uniqueness.

A booklet was published with Van Horn Press, including visuals and a text by Veit Loers